Services

APNC is known for our educational opportunities & legislative voice.

However did you know APNC has other service arms?
Learn more below.

About College Recovery Programs

Collegiate Recovery arose as a response to the need to support young people in recovery as they choose to pursue their education.

While mutual-aid support groups have traditionally handled recovery support for individuals leaving treatment, for those wishing to pursue higher education, a whole set of challenges confronts them when they step on a college campus. Categorized as “recovery hostile” many campuses have now seen the need to support these students. Some students face tremendous trepidation when they decide to attend or return to school, and collegiate recovery can alleviate some of the stress associated with this decision.

 

What, How, Why

NC CRC Contact Info

Resources and Research

Collegiate Recovery

NC CRC Contact Info

Jarmicha el Harris
Coordinator

Website

Twitter

Facebook 

Instagram

Jessica Pinti-Dunson

Kelly O’Donnell
Coordinators

Website

Facebook 

Instagram

Bryce McColloch
Coordinator

Website

Facebook 

Instagram

Ches Kennedy
Coordinator

Website

Instagram

Dr. Dominique Clemmons-James
Dr. Vivian BarnetteCoordinator
Coordinators

Website

Instagram

Megan Meadows
Coordinator

Website

Twitter

Instagram

Ben Asma
Kiauhna Haynes
Coordinators

Website

Instagram

N/A

DeAn White
Coordinator

Website

Marbeth Holmes
Coordinator

Collegiate Recovery

Resources & Research

Association of Recovery in Higher Education
collegiaterecovery.org

 

Association of Recovery in Higher Education
recoveryschools.org

 

Transforming Youth Recovery
transformingyouthrecovery.org

William White Papers
williamwhitepapers.com

 

Recovery Communities of North Carolina
rcnc.org

 

Campus Recovery Magazine
recoverycampus.com

Mid-Atlantic Collegiate Recovery Conference
collegiatesrecover.org

 

Division of Mental Health Developmental Disabilities and Substance Abuse Services
ncdhhs.gov/divisions/mhddsas

NC Partnerships for Success (PFS)

APNC is staffing a $10M five-year SAMHSA grant that was awarded to the NC Division of Mental Health/Developmental Disabilities/Substance Abuse Services.

The primary goal of the PFS grant is to utilize the Strategic Planning Framework (SPF) to prevent underage drinking and e-cigarette and cannabis use. The grant operates at three interdependent scales — statewide, within 10 select communities, and with a network of colleges.

Community

College Campuses

Peer Support

NC Partnerships for Success (PFS)

Community

The majority of grant funding is being directed to the following ten counties and community coalitions — Avery, Cumberland, Dare/Currituck, Forsyth, Haywood, Johnston, McDowell, Mecklenburg, Onslow/Carteret, and Wilson. PFS communities were prioritized for selection based on need and capacity and their focus on special populations, such as military families and/or historically black colleges and universities.

A focus on addressing health disparities at the community scale is a central component of this work. Each community is working on prevention of underage drinking and one additional target substance (e-cigarettes or cannabis).

NC Partnerships for Success (PFS)

College Campuses

For more information please contact:

Basil Savitsky, NC/PFS
Program Director
bsavitsky@apnc.org

Or

Elizabeth Montgomery, NC/PFS
Coordinator
emontgomery@apnc.org

  1. APNC has worked with 9 government agencies and 12 statewide collegiate organizations and colleges to form the Collegiate Policy Advisory Committee (CPAC).

    The NC Institute of Medicine has facilitated quarterly meetings of CPAC to develop a strategic plan for substance use prevention on NC college campuses. CPAC has formed 3 workgroups — Data and Social Costs, Best Practices, and Workforce Development, with each workgroup advancing specific elements of the statewide strategic plan.

  2. The WNC Network is working to include more community colleges in the membership of the Higher Education Coalition for the prevention of Alcohol and Other Drugs.

    The staff at APNC is composed of prevention, harm reduction, treatment and The WNC Network is holding a series of zoom calls on assessment that will lead to the design pilot prevention implementations on select campuses. The Network is also hosting professional development opportunities for the prevention of e-cigarette use.

  3. The PFS grant is facilitating the growth of three collegiate networks.

    A Statewide Network of Historically Black Colleges (HBCUs) and Universities and Minority-Serving Institutions (MSIs) has formed and is meeting on-line on a monthly basis. The HBCU/MSI network is planning a “virtual town hall” on assessment of current prevention practices, a virtual student panel, and the live-streaming a national speaker on the impact of cannabis on people of color.

  4. The eastern NC Network is focusing on building campus-community collaboration through “town/gown” partnerships.

    It is providing a professional development on the prevention of underage drinking.

NC Partnerships for Success (PFS)

Peer Support

We have been seeing a new emergence in the field of addiction that has been very effective and a beautiful addition to the recovery field evolution.

It is the fact that peer support specialists are being recognized for the invaluable asset they are to those that are looking to make changes in their lives. What makes specialists so special is they too have navigated similar experiences and can use their lived experience and professional training to lesson the burdens of sustained change others are going through as well.

Peer Support Specialists are working with health care system, judicial system and working one on ones with peers in their community and offering services through many other organizations as well.

We at APNC want those peer support specialists to know we see you and are very appreciative for all the work you do in the state and across the country.

We stand behind the mission and vision developed for Peer support of North Carolina. As an organization we want to make sure to help bridge gaps anywhere we can to ensure peer support is being utilized and seen as an essential component in the continuum of care.

Peer Support of North Carolina: Mission & Vision

“To develop a qualified Peer Support Specialist workforce that has the support, access, credibility, competency, respect and the valued role within the mental health and substance use disorder service delivery system to positively impact the lives of individuals experiencing mental health and addiction challenges. This is accomplished through the NC Certified Peer Support Specialist Program.”

Leadership Academy

This Collegiate Recovery for Prevention and Health Policy Leadership Initiative model has two components.

This initiative targets both students who are in recovery and those who are interested in promoting prevention, health and wellness on their campuses and communities. Together, the two target populations anchor the academy firmly in the need to better synthesize recovery and prevention efforts across the state- where efforts focus on pro-social opportunities, creating healthy campus communities, and inclusion in prevention programming. This component would last six months.

THE GOALS OF THIS ACADEMY ARE:
  • To provide a program that capitalizes on existing partnership in behavioral health across the state, connecting local and regional mentors to students, thereby maximizing the mentor to mentee interaction, enhancing opportunities for learning, networking, and life-long connections in the fields of recovery and prevention.
  • To expand career pathway options for students in prevention and behavioral health, by pairing them with high quality mentors, which greatly expands the ability of the student to understand the competencies needed to be a prevention/behavioral health professional, to access work-based learning opportunities, internships and job shadowing opportunities and to expand awareness of and access to post-graduation employment opportunities.
  • To provide students the opportunity to have their impact projects, and experiences in the leadership academy highlighted at in-state behavioral health conferences, through presentations and other engagement activities as students in recovery and/ or invested in the promotion of health and wellness through prevention.
  • To maximize the number of students who are able to access this program by providing this in the state with local and regional context and connectivity.
  • To facilitate the co-conception (via the mentoring relationship) and student led development of an impact project focused on important questions in recovery and prevention, in either specific mentor – mentee partnership, or through a group developed project, involving multiple students and mentors within a local or regional context.

State Health Policy Leadership and School Improvement Initiative. This
leadership initiative targets students who have participated in either the SAFE National Collegiate Recovery Leadership program and/or a state specific leadership academy. This component would last six months.

THE GOALS OF THIS ACADEMY ARE:
  • To prepare students to actively engage in positively impacting their college or university environments, and to facilitate action.
  • To build capacity, knowledge and skills of students to research and evaluate higher education policies, services, and conditions and to recommend solutions that are effective, stigma-free, in line with best practices, and financially sound.
  • To provide training and facilitation for students on effective methods for affecting cultural change on campuses as it relates to substance use and abuse.
  • To connect students across campuses in order to facilitate coordination and hands-on learning.
  • To provide ongoing technical assistance to student groups at each campus, to assist with analyzing issues, implementing approaches, and overcoming barriers.
  • To utilize students’ lived experiences, passions, and current educational pursuits to positively influence AOD policies, services, and supports within their local college or university.
  • To provide higher education professionals with tools and resources in order to help them guide student learning in the context of university/college policy and campus culture.